It might seem silly to see kids strike a Superman or a Wonder Woman pose. While it might really look silly, if not awkward, science tells us that they can help boost a child’s confidence and self-esteem. That’s right; power poses have a positive effect on a child.

The concept of power posing (a.k.a. postural feedback) became a business world fixation in 2012. That year, social psychologist Amy Cuddy presented a TED Talk detailing her 2010 research with psychologist Dana Carney and Andy Tap. It quickly became the second most-watched TED Talk ever.

The gist of Cuddy’s hypothesis is simple. Nonverbals, such as body language, don’t just affect how others perceive us; they also change how we perceive ourselves. If we maintain “high-power poses”—that is, postures expressing friendliness, strength, and openness—our minds will interpret those qualities as self-possessed.

This power-posing works on adults as well, according to Cuddy’s TED Talk video.

More details about this topic over Big Think.

(Image Credit: AD_Images/ Pixabay)



Categories: Latest